Community Climate Action Plan

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We can see evidence of a warming planet every day. Any positive steps we take to tackle climate change is referred to as Climate Action. But in order to take action, we must first determine:

  • What are the biggest local sources of GHG emissions?
  • What volume of emissions do we create locally?
  • What bold actions can our community take to reduce our local production of GHG’s?

The Village of Pemberton Community Climate Action Plan addresses these questions. The Plan was developed in partnership with the Community Energy Association, a non-profit agency with much experience, and informed by community consultation. View the Village of Pemberton Community Climate Action Plan.


Researchers under the Pemberton icecap

Understanding Climate Change

More heatwaves, fewer cold spells, less snow and ice and earlier spring run-off are all signs of climate change. Locally, we are seeing the Pemberton icecap retreating, the glacier atop Mount Meagre shrinking and permafrost deep within Mount Currie melting. Receding glaciers increase landslide risk. Wildfires ravage our province every summer and flooding is a growing, although familiar, threat.

Understanding climate change starts with understanding the atmosphere. The atmosphere that surrounds the Earth is like a bubble that protects us from the harshest rays of the sun and the cold of space. It also contains greenhouse gases (GHG’s), which include the air we breathe (oxygen) and others that help keep the Earth at the perfect temperature. Finally, the atmosphere naturally releases extra gases into space.

The problem, of course, is that over the last 150 years, the level of GHG’s released into the atmosphere has increased dramatically. The power for our cars and truck, lights, refrigerators, laptops, etc. comes from burning coal, natural gas, and oil (fossil fuels), all of which release greenhouse gases (GHG) into the atmosphere.

Too many GHG’s in the atmosphere become trapped and this warms the planet.


What is a Community Climate Action Plan?

A Community Climate Action Plan (CCAP) is a plan to mitigate, or reduce, a community’s territorial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Mitigation v. Adaptation

Climate change mitigation is the process of reducing GHG emissions to limit the impact of a changing climate. Examples of climate change mitigation include: replacing traditional vehicles with electric vehicles, making our homes more energy efficient so that we use less fuel to heat them, and composting organic waste. Climate change adaptation is the process of adapting to a changing climate. Examples of climate change adaptation include: fuel-thinning forested areas that are close to communities to reduce the risk of wildfire, flood defenses, and making homes resilient to climate extremes. This plan will focus on mitigation actions.

Territorial v. Consumptive

GHG emissions fall into two categories: territorial and consumptive. Territorial-based GHG emissions are those that the community is directly responsible for within its geographic boundaries and includes emissions from buildings, transportation and organic waste in the landfill. Consumptive-based GHG emissions are those that the community is indirectly responsible for and includes emissions from producing goods and services such as food, clothing and electronics. The Plan focuses on reducing territorial emissions.

Community v. Corporate

Community GHG emissions are those that come from all our community’s buildings, vehicles and waste production, including residential and commercial buildings and vehicles. Corporate GHG emissions are those produced as a result of municipal operations such as snow ploughing, fire services, community centres and administrative buildings. Corporate GHG emissions account for a small percentage of Community GHG emissions. Actions to reduce Community GHG emissions include providing infrastructure (such as cycling routes and EV charging stations), policies (such as energy efficiency requirements for new buildings), and outreach (such as promoting retrofit programs to the community). Actions to reduce Corporate GHG emissions include retrofitting Community Centres and Administrative Buildings to reduce energy consumption and switching to low-carbon fleet vehicles. Projects that reduce Corporate GHG emissions will have a small impact on overall Community GHG emissions but can be worthy anchor projects to inspire change throughout a community. The Plan focuses on broader Community Actions but will feature some actions for the Village to show leadership in its own operations.

We can see evidence of a warming planet every day. Any positive steps we take to tackle climate change is referred to as Climate Action. But in order to take action, we must first determine:

  • What are the biggest local sources of GHG emissions?
  • What volume of emissions do we create locally?
  • What bold actions can our community take to reduce our local production of GHG’s?

The Village of Pemberton Community Climate Action Plan addresses these questions. The Plan was developed in partnership with the Community Energy Association, a non-profit agency with much experience, and informed by community consultation. View the Village of Pemberton Community Climate Action Plan.


Researchers under the Pemberton icecap

Understanding Climate Change

More heatwaves, fewer cold spells, less snow and ice and earlier spring run-off are all signs of climate change. Locally, we are seeing the Pemberton icecap retreating, the glacier atop Mount Meagre shrinking and permafrost deep within Mount Currie melting. Receding glaciers increase landslide risk. Wildfires ravage our province every summer and flooding is a growing, although familiar, threat.

Understanding climate change starts with understanding the atmosphere. The atmosphere that surrounds the Earth is like a bubble that protects us from the harshest rays of the sun and the cold of space. It also contains greenhouse gases (GHG’s), which include the air we breathe (oxygen) and others that help keep the Earth at the perfect temperature. Finally, the atmosphere naturally releases extra gases into space.

The problem, of course, is that over the last 150 years, the level of GHG’s released into the atmosphere has increased dramatically. The power for our cars and truck, lights, refrigerators, laptops, etc. comes from burning coal, natural gas, and oil (fossil fuels), all of which release greenhouse gases (GHG) into the atmosphere.

Too many GHG’s in the atmosphere become trapped and this warms the planet.


What is a Community Climate Action Plan?

A Community Climate Action Plan (CCAP) is a plan to mitigate, or reduce, a community’s territorial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Mitigation v. Adaptation

Climate change mitigation is the process of reducing GHG emissions to limit the impact of a changing climate. Examples of climate change mitigation include: replacing traditional vehicles with electric vehicles, making our homes more energy efficient so that we use less fuel to heat them, and composting organic waste. Climate change adaptation is the process of adapting to a changing climate. Examples of climate change adaptation include: fuel-thinning forested areas that are close to communities to reduce the risk of wildfire, flood defenses, and making homes resilient to climate extremes. This plan will focus on mitigation actions.

Territorial v. Consumptive

GHG emissions fall into two categories: territorial and consumptive. Territorial-based GHG emissions are those that the community is directly responsible for within its geographic boundaries and includes emissions from buildings, transportation and organic waste in the landfill. Consumptive-based GHG emissions are those that the community is indirectly responsible for and includes emissions from producing goods and services such as food, clothing and electronics. The Plan focuses on reducing territorial emissions.

Community v. Corporate

Community GHG emissions are those that come from all our community’s buildings, vehicles and waste production, including residential and commercial buildings and vehicles. Corporate GHG emissions are those produced as a result of municipal operations such as snow ploughing, fire services, community centres and administrative buildings. Corporate GHG emissions account for a small percentage of Community GHG emissions. Actions to reduce Community GHG emissions include providing infrastructure (such as cycling routes and EV charging stations), policies (such as energy efficiency requirements for new buildings), and outreach (such as promoting retrofit programs to the community). Actions to reduce Corporate GHG emissions include retrofitting Community Centres and Administrative Buildings to reduce energy consumption and switching to low-carbon fleet vehicles. Projects that reduce Corporate GHG emissions will have a small impact on overall Community GHG emissions but can be worthy anchor projects to inspire change throughout a community. The Plan focuses on broader Community Actions but will feature some actions for the Village to show leadership in its own operations.

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Page last updated: 27 Apr 2022, 01:31 PM